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20121004
20121004
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
whose gang name was smiley. he is written about in my book. smiley was a young man of 19, when i first sat down with him at home when industries. one thing he said to me was -- why was no one there for me. why does no one speak to me and why did nobody tried to stop this. he was arrested when he was 16 years old. he was told to lie about his age and say he was 18, so they could be together in jail. and from there his story unfolded. different things were done with him. ultimately, spile -- smiley was helped, but his words haunted me. why did no one speak to me, and why did no one tried to stop me. i began to listen to the stories of the gang members, and my research team at ucla discovered some startling truths. gang members to leave the gangs. they leave the gang for a variety of reasons. they all have a turning point, when they decide to leave. and it changes them. this would be something that any of you would logically imagine. for female gang members, and we did not see many of them on that video, but they are out there. they are not mothers, they are active gang members. female ga
tavis: good evening. i'm tavis smiley. one debate down, 3 to go. i will look at the issue of voter suppression. ari berman has focused much of his attention on an underreported story this election season, namely efforts to prevent americans from exercising their democratic right. on the ballot for the -- the battle for the ballot and hoped the issue may be backfiring on those who support it. a conversation with ari berman from "the nation" comin gup now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: ari berman is a political correspondent for "the nation" and author of the book "herding donkeys." last year he wrote a piece called "the gop war on voting." much of what he wrote has come to fruitio
of them. and he did it in a smiley, upbeat manner but he was firm, and he destroyed them. >> he kept saying, i'm just saying. >> he's a morning person obviously. >> they will have the next debate at breakfast. >> what's the possibility, this was his anniversary, the president, that he celebrated the anniversary before he got on stage last night? maybe with a glass of champagne, whatever, celebrated. >> gladded you added -- >> i'm glad you qualified that. >> i knew one thing, i'm not -- >> alex is having trouble. >> i'm not having mashed potatoes for lunch, that's for sure. watch dan rather's live election night cov an on act is tv. a plav to haeasure to have you. >>> the split screen says it all. can you tell who won the debate by turning off the sound? we'll evaluate the stage presence, james licthen joins the table next on "now." ally bank. why they have a raise your rate cd. tonight our guest, thomas sargent. nobel laureate in economics, and one of the most cited economists in the world. professor sargent, can you tell me what cd rates will be in two years? no. if he can't, no one
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)